Can we just talk for a second about this hardcore badass?  This is Terry Chimes.  Let me tell you about Terry Chimes.
When Terry Chimes was four years old, he decided that he was going to be a doctor.  But not right away.  First, he declared, he was going to be a rock’n’roll star.
Later on, he reasoned, why not?  It had to happen to someone, why not to him?  And he might as well do it while he was still young and stupid, while he still could, and then he’d go on and be a doctor, afterward.  So Terry joined a slightly awful and somewhat mythical band called London SS, which never played live and never recorded anything, and became a rock star.
Well, maybe it wasn’t that straightforward.  Maybe through London SS, Terry met people like Mick Jones and Tony James and Paul Simonon; maybe that’s how he was roped into the early punk project eventually known as The Clash; maybe it was with them that he recorded The Clash, the album that kicked off their careers, credited him by the name “Tory Crimes” and didn’t include his picture on the album cover with the rest of the band.
Maybe it was with them that he’d play until his hands bled every night at gigs, and then he’d have to go and deal with the arguing and in-fighting between band members until he finally said, that’s it, I’m leaving, I don’t like this (and Joe Strummer – Joe, of all people, famous for getting rid of people without a second thought when he’d decided they didn’t suit his ideals or his goals anymore – was absolutely gutted when he left).
And yet, there he was again, five years later when Topper Headon left the band, to pick up the pieces and go on tour supporting The Who with his old bandmates, no hard feelings.  Not that he’d been doing anything particularly impressive in the interim, just, y’know, backing for Billy Idol along with Generation X.  And playing with three other bands.  And releasing records.  And being generally goddamned awesome.
And after he left The Clash for the final time?  He played with such low-profile, little-known artists as Johnny Thunders, Hanoi Rocks, the Bay City Rollers and, oh, yeah.  Black Sabbath.  Just as a sideline.  You know.  Until he became a doctor.
And four-year-old Terry Chimes, the one that wanted to become a-doctor-but-not-right-away?  Not forgotten.  After nearly twenty years on the music scene, Terry went, oh, all right, I think it’s probably time now, and went to school to become a chiropractor.  (Why a chiropractor?  Because one did wonders for him when he was drumming with Black Sabbath.)  He didn’t tell anyone on his course that he’d been in a band, much less with whom, because he thought they might think he was a bit weird.
Of course, then The Clash’s “Should I Stay Or Should I Go?” was re-released, shot to number one on the UK singles chart, and everyone on his chiropractors’ course saw him in the music video and wanted to know why the hell he hadn’t mentioned that minor detail about himself.
The Clash were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, including Terry as their original drummer.  He went to the ceremony along with Mick and Paul, while Topper Headon couldn’t; as a result, his acceptance speech praised Topper and his work, because Terry?  Terry is a class act.
So that’s Terry Chimes.  “I’m going to be a doctor,” he said, and now he runs one of the most successful practices in Europe, along with seminars and a practice management company.  “But first, I’m going to be a star,” he said, and now he’s in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, because Terry Chimes does not do things by halves.
And the best part?
Most of his patients still have no idea.

Can we just talk for a second about this hardcore badass?  This is Terry Chimes.  Let me tell you about Terry Chimes.

When Terry Chimes was four years old, he decided that he was going to be a doctor.  But not right away.  First, he declared, he was going to be a rock’n’roll star.

Later on, he reasoned, why not?  It had to happen to someone, why not to him?  And he might as well do it while he was still young and stupid, while he still could, and then he’d go on and be a doctor, afterward.  So Terry joined a slightly awful and somewhat mythical band called London SS, which never played live and never recorded anything, and became a rock star.

Well, maybe it wasn’t that straightforward.  Maybe through London SS, Terry met people like Mick Jones and Tony James and Paul Simonon; maybe that’s how he was roped into the early punk project eventually known as The Clash; maybe it was with them that he recorded The Clash, the album that kicked off their careers, credited him by the name “Tory Crimes” and didn’t include his picture on the album cover with the rest of the band.

Maybe it was with them that he’d play until his hands bled every night at gigs, and then he’d have to go and deal with the arguing and in-fighting between band members until he finally said, that’s it, I’m leaving, I don’t like this (and Joe Strummer – Joe, of all people, famous for getting rid of people without a second thought when he’d decided they didn’t suit his ideals or his goals anymore – was absolutely gutted when he left).

And yet, there he was again, five years later when Topper Headon left the band, to pick up the pieces and go on tour supporting The Who with his old bandmates, no hard feelings.  Not that he’d been doing anything particularly impressive in the interim, just, y’know, backing for Billy Idol along with Generation X.  And playing with three other bands.  And releasing records.  And being generally goddamned awesome.

And after he left The Clash for the final time?  He played with such low-profile, little-known artists as Johnny Thunders, Hanoi Rocks, the Bay City Rollers and, oh, yeah.  Black Sabbath.  Just as a sideline.  You know.  Until he became a doctor.

And four-year-old Terry Chimes, the one that wanted to become a-doctor-but-not-right-away?  Not forgotten.  After nearly twenty years on the music scene, Terry went, oh, all right, I think it’s probably time now, and went to school to become a chiropractor.  (Why a chiropractor?  Because one did wonders for him when he was drumming with Black Sabbath.)  He didn’t tell anyone on his course that he’d been in a band, much less with whom, because he thought they might think he was a bit weird.

Of course, then The Clash’s “Should I Stay Or Should I Go?” was re-released, shot to number one on the UK singles chart, and everyone on his chiropractors’ course saw him in the music video and wanted to know why the hell he hadn’t mentioned that minor detail about himself.

The Clash were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, including Terry as their original drummer.  He went to the ceremony along with Mick and Paul, while Topper Headon couldn’t; as a result, his acceptance speech praised Topper and his work, because Terry?  Terry is a class act.

So that’s Terry Chimes.  “I’m going to be a doctor,” he said, and now he runs one of the most successful practices in Europe, along with seminars and a practice management company.  “But first, I’m going to be a star,” he said, and now he’s in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, because Terry Chimes does not do things by halves.

And the best part?

Most of his patients still have no idea.